Rubus idaeus

799px-Rubus_idaeus_Sturm08014

Sturm, J. (1796). Deutschlands Flora in Abbildungen. Retrieved from: http://www.biolib.de

Botanical Name: Rubus idaeus
Common name: Red Raspberry (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
Family: Rosaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
Parts used: leaf, fruit (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)

 

History/Folklore: While the fruit have been eaten as a fruit, raspberry leaves have been used traditionally to prepare the uterus for childbirth (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 782).

 

Constituents:

  • Flavonoids: glycosides of kaempferol and quercetin
  • Tannins
  • Fruit sugar
  • Volatile oil
  • Pectin
  • Citric acid
  • Malic acid

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)

 

Actions

  • Astringent (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578; Bone, 2003, p. 381; Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 783)
  • Tonic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 783)
  • Partus preparatory (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 783; Bone, 2003, p. 381; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)

 

Indications

  • Pregnancy
    • Strengthen and tones tissue of the uterus (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
    • Strengthens contractions (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
  • Abnormal bleeding of uterus, stomach or intestine (Bone, 2003, p. 381)
  • Leukorrhea (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
  • Ulcers (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
  • Bleeding gums (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
  • Tonsillitis (Topical) (Bone, 2003, p. 381)
  • Conjunctivitis (Bone, 2003, p. 381)
  • Dysmenorrhea (Bone, 2003, p. 381)
  • Diarrhoea (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 783)

 

Dosage:

  • 5-14mL liquid extract (1:2)/day
  • 30-100mL liquid extract (1:2)/week

(Bone, 2003, p. 381)

 

Preparation

  • Gargle for sore throat (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 578)
  • Infusion: 4-8g dried leaf/tds (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 784)


Cautions

  • May cause gastrointestinal discomfort due to tannin content (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 784)
  • Clinical studies suggest that the herb is safest when consumed after the first trimester (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 784)

 

Contraindications

  • Constipation
  • Peptic ulcer
  • Gastrointestinal conditions associated with inflammation

(Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 784)

 

Interactions: May decrease absorption of iron, magnesium and calcium (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 784)

Mitchella repens

SAW_02245

Wasowski, A & S. (2006). Mitchella repens. Retrieved from: http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=23299

Botanical Name: Mitchella repens
Common name: Partridgeberry (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 568), Squaw vine (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 291)
Family: Rubiaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 568)
Parts used: Aerial parts (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 568)

Constituents: Unspecified alkaloids, saponins, glycosides, tannins and mucilage’s have been reported (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 568)

 

Actions

  • Postpartum (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Emmenagogue (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 291; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Diuretic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Uterine Tonic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Astringent (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)

 

Indications

  • Traditionally used in preparation for childbirth (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 301)
  • Dysmenorrhoea (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Colitis with presence of mucus (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Amenorrhoea (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)
  • Chronic congestion of the uterus (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)

 

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Tincture (1:5 in 40%): 2-4mL/tds
  • Infusion: 1tsp/cup water/tds

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569)

 

Cautions & Contraindications: None known, however traditional use as an abortifacient would suggest the herb is inappropriate in the first stages of pregnancy (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 569; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 291)