Tribulus terrestris

demirdikeni1

Tuscu, S. (2008). Çocuk İstiyorum Tüp Bebek. Retrieved from: http://www.cocukistiyorum.com/tr/content.asp?PID=%7B1050DD8C-F0E6-4668-9FCB-32EF4A44F9FA%7D&PT=%20Yumurta%20kalitesi%20ve%20sperm%20say%FDs%FDn%FD%20art%FDran%20bitki

Botanical Name: Tribulus terrestris
Common name: Tribulus, Gokshur (Sanskrit), Gokharu (Hindi), Puncture vine (Chhatre, Nesari, Somani, Kanchan & Sathaye, 2014).
Family: Zygophyllaceae (Chhatre et al., 2014).
Parts used: Dried fruit (Chhatre et al., 2014).

Quality: In Ayurvedia medicine Tribulus is describes as madhura (sweet), gura (heavy to digest), brumhema (nourishing) and Vatanut (pacifies vata dhsa).

Constituents: Saponins (incl. furostanol, spirostanol and sarsasapogenin), flavonoids, glycosides (incl. spirostanol glycosides) and alkaloids (Chhatre et al., 2014).

 

Actions

  • Diuretic
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Antiurolithic
  • Immunomodulatory
  • Cardiotonic
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Analgesic
  • Anti-spasmodic
  • Anti-cancer
  • Anti-bacterial
  • Anthelmintic

(Chhatre et al., 2014).

 

Indications

  • Coronary Artery Disease (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Infertility (men) (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Infertility (women) (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Exercise performance enhancement (Natural Standard, 2014)

In Auyrvedic medicine, the herb is indicated in the genitourinary tract to clear urinary stones, as a urinary disinfectant and for impotence (Chhatre et al., 2014)

Accoring to Chhatre, in TCM the herb is used to “restore depressed liver, treat feeling of fullness in chest, mastitis, flatulence, acute conjunctivitis, headache and vitiligo” (2014).

 

Cautions

  • Individuals with menstrual disorders as it may cause menorrhagia (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia as it may increase prostate volume (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Hypoglycemia/diabetes as it may decrease blood sugar levels (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Pregnancy due to traditional use as abortifacent (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Contraindications: Know allergy (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Interactions

  • Beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Digoxin due to evidence of positive ionotropic activity (Natural Standard, 2014)

Coleus forskohlii

Coleus

Wall, M. (2014). Coleus. Retrieved from: http://www.truestarhealth.com/Notes/2071003.html

Botanical Name: Coleus forskohlii
Common name: Coleus (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
Family: Labiatae (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
Parts used: Root (Bone, 2003, p. 156)

Constituents: Forskolin (Bone, 2003, p. 156)

Actions

  • Hypotensive (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Antiplatelet (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Broncho-spasmolytic (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Spasmolytic (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Cardiotonic (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Digestive stimulant (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Aromatic digestive (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Galactagogue (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Indications

  • Congestive heart disease (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Asthma (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Glaucoma (topical) (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Hypertension (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Ischemic heart disease (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Thrombosis (relating to platelet activity) (Bone, 2003, p. 156)
  • Depression & Schizophrenia (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Erectile dysfunction (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Preparation & Dosage

3-6mL liquid extract (1:1)/day

40-90mL liquid extract (1:1)/week

4-6 drops liquid extract (1:1) prepared in water/saline for an eye bath (allow alcohol to evaporate before administered)

(Bone, 2003, p. 156)

 

Cautions: Peptic ulcer (Bone, 2003, p. 156)

 

Contraindications: Contraindicated in hypotension (Bone, 2003, p. 156)

Leonurus cardiaca

show_image
UniProt Consortium (2014). SPECIES Leonurus japonicus (Chinese motherwort) (Leonurus artemisia). Retrieved from: hengduan.huh.harvard.edu

Botanical Name: Leonurus cardiaca
Common name: Motherwort (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
Family: Lamiaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
Parts used: Aerial parts (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)

Constituents: Iridoids (incl. leonuride); labdane diterpenes (incl. leocardin); flavonoids (incl. apigenin, kaempferol, and quercetin glucosides); caffeic acid; alkaloids (incl. tachydrine, betonicine, turicin, leonurine); tannins; and volatile oil (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562).

Actions

  • Nervine (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Emmenagogue (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Antispasmodic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Hepatic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Cardiotonic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Hypotensive (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Anti-arrhythmic (Bone, 2003, p. 331)

 

Indications

  • Delayed or suppressed menstruation (esp. when related to anxiety and tension) (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562).
  • Congestive amenorrhea (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Dysmenorrhoea (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • False labor pains (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Menopausal symptoms (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Tachycardia (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Anxiety and tension (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Insomnia (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Anemic nervousness (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Cardiac weakness following infection (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Hyperthyroidism (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Neuralgia (Bone, 2003, p. 331)

 

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Liquid extract (1:2):2,0-3.5mL/day or 15-25mL/week (Bone, 2003, p. 331)
  • Tincture (1:5 in 40%): 1-4mL/tds (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Infusion: 1-2tsp/1cup water/tds (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)

 

Contraindications

  • Pregnancy (Bone, 2003, p. 331)

 

Interactions: May interfere with cardiovascular medications (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)

Crataegus oxyacantha/C. monogyna

espino_blanco
HYPERnatural.com. (2014). ESPINO BLANCO. Retrieved from: http://www.hipernatural.com/es/pltespino_blanco.html

Botanical Name: Crataegus oxyacantha/C. monogyna
Common name: Hawthorn, C. laevingata (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671), Shan zha (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)
Family: Rosaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 672)
Parts used: Leaf, flower and berry (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)

Quality: Warm tendency, neutral, sour and sweet (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)

History/Folklore: Berry, flower and leaf have all being used medicinally, however modern research tends to focus on the leaves and flowers (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671). Traditionally Hawthorn was used to treat cardiovascular problems and circulatory disorders (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671).

Constituents: Oligomeric procyanidins (notably: procyanidin b-2); Monomers (epictechin and catechin); Flavonoids (incl. quercetin glycosides, hyperoside and rutin);

Actions

  • Cardiotonic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 542)
  • Cardioprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 671, 674)
  • Antioxidant (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 671, 675)
    • Hawthorn acts as a co-factor for vitamin C (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Collagen stabilising (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Mild astringent (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 542)
  • Mild hypotensive (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 542)
  • Anti-arrhythmic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Vasorelaxant (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 674)
  • Diuretic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 542)
  • Stabilizes connective tissue tone (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Antibacterial (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)
  • Antibiotic (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)

TCM specific: Reduces stagnation, reduces food stagnantion, promotes digestion, harmonizes and tonifies spleen, Moves blood, Regulates blood and breaks up accumulation (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)

 

Indications

  • Cardiovascular disease (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 542)
  • Hypoxemia (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 542)
  • Congestive heart disease as a result of ischaemia (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 671, 677-678)
  • Hypertension (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 671, 681)
  • Acne (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Anxiety (in combination) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Hyperlipidaemia (notably the berries) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 671)
  • Hypercholesterolaemia (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)
  • Arteriosclerosis (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682)

 

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Infusion of dried plant: 1.5-3.5g/day
  • Berry liquid extract (1:2): 3-6mL/day
  • Leaf liquid extract (1:2): 3-7mL/day
  • Berry tincture (1:5): 17.6mL/day

(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 672)

 

Cautions

  • As it stimulates gastric juice production, use with caution in individuals with a history of peptic ulcers or gastritis (Hempen & Fischer, 2007, p. 682).

 

Combinations: For high blood pressure, Hawthron berries may be combined with Lime Blossom, Mistletoe and Yarrow (Hoffmann, 1990, p. 206)

 

Interactions:

  • Not to be used in conjunction with heart and blood pressure medications without practitioner supervision (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 682)

Panax ginseng

panax_ginseng

Johal, R. (2012). Ginseng and Ginkgo Biloba Complex shows promise for mental tasks. Retrieved from: http://www.predatornutrition.com/blog/2012/03/08/ginseng-and-ginkgo-biloba-complex-shows-promise-for-mental-tasks/

Botanical Name: Panax ginseng
Common name: Korean Ginseng, Panax, Ren Shen (Mandarine), Ninjin (Japanese) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
Family: Araliaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 570)
Parts used: Root (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 570)

Folklore and traditional use: In Chinese, Gin referres to “man” and seng to “essence” (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 199). The name panax is said to be derived from the Greek word pancea meaning “cure all” (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628). It is considered to be the most potent Qi tonic in Chinese Medicine (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 199), and is indicated in collapsed Qi conditions (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628). It is proposed to:

  • Generates fluids
  • Tonify lungs and stomach
  • Strengthens the spleen
  • Calms the spirit manifestation of heart Qi.

(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)

 

Traditional TCM indications include:

  • Shallow or labored breathing
  • Lethargy
  • Chest and abdominal distention
  • Palpitations with anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Restlessness

(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)

In Western herbal medicine the herb is traditionally used as a mild stomachic, tonic, and a stimulant for anorexia and nervous related digestive complaints (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628).

Having wide range pharmacological properties, ginseng appears to have whole body effects as well as having a profound influence on the metabolism of an individual cell (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628). There is no equivalent concept or treatment in contemporary biomedicine (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628). Recent western studies fail to establish the efficiency of ginseng root extract to support traditional indications (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 199).

 

Constituents: Ginsenosides (a complex mixture of triterpene dammarane and oleanane saponins); Polysaccarhides; Essential oil; Diacetylenes; Peptides; Trilinolein; and Arginine (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 629)

 

Actions

  • Adaptogen (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628: Hoffmann, 2003, p. 570)
  • Tonic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 570)
  • Stimulant (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 570)
  • Immunomodulator (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628; Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 200)
  • Cardiotonic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Hypoglycemic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 570; Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 200)
  • Hepatoprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 200)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 200)
  • Anti-oxidant (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 203)
  • Anxiolytic (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 203)

 

Indications

Clinical

  • Improve cerebro-vascular deficit (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Improve cognitive performance (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Congestive heart failure (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Cancer prevention (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Depressed bone marrow associated with radiation therapy (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Erectile dysfunction (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628; Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 204)
  • Male fertility problems (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Type 2 diabeties (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Acne (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 204)
  • Hair growth (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 203)
  • Anemia (By promoting haemopoiesis) (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 203)

Generally Panax increases vitatily and the body’s ability to withstand stress. It does this by:

  • Acting on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal cortex,
  • Restoring and strengthening the body’s immune system
  • Promotes longevity, growth and metabolism of normal body cells (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)

 

Traditional

  • Heart failure (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Dyspepsia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Asthma (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Organ prolapse (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Spontaneous sweating (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Palpitations (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Neuralgia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Neurosis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Anxiety (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Long term debility (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Menopausal symptoms (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 204)

 

Preparation & Dosage:

  • Decoction: 0.5tsp powdered root/1 cup water. Bring to boil, simmer for 10 mins/tds
  • Tincture: (1:5 in 60%) 1-2mL (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)

 

Cautions

  • Avoid concurrent stimulents such as caffine and amphetamines (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)
  • Acute infections (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 628)
  • Ginseng abuse syndrome has been reported in individuals, with effects including hypertension, nervousness, insomnia, morning diarrhoea and skin reactions (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 206)
  • Pregnancy (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 207)

 

Contradictions:

  • Acute asthma (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)
  • Fever (Braun & Cohen, 2005, p. 206)
  • Excessive menstruation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)
  • Nose bleeds (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)

Interactions

  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitor “phenolzine” (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)
  • Warfarin (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 644)