Epilobium parviflorum

Onagraceae_-_Epilobium_parviflorum-2

Hectenichus. (2008). Onagraceae – Epilobium parvifloru. Retrieved from: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0

Botanical Name: Epilobium parviflorum
Common name: Willow herb (Bone, 2003, p. 468)
Family: Onagraceae (Hevesi, Houghton, Habtemariam & Kery, 2009, Abstract)
Parts used: Aerial parts (Bone, 2003, p. 468)

History/Folklore: Used in the mid-twentieth centenary European herbal medicine for disorders of the prostate (Bone, 2003, p. 468).

 

Actions

  • Antiprostatic (Bone, 2003, p. 468)
  • Antioxidant (Hevesi et al., 2009, Abstract)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Hevesi et al., 2009, Abstract)

 

Epilobium parviflorum extract has shown to inhibit the ezyme 5α-reductase, responsible for biosynthesis of DHT from testosterone in vitro, potentially the mechanism of the herb’s antiprostatic effects (Bone, 2003, p. 268)

 

Indications

  • Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Hevesi et al., 2009, Abstract)

 

Preparation & Dosage:

  • 3-6mL liquid extract (1:2)/day
  • 20-40mL liquid extract (1:2)/week

(Bone, 2003, p. 468)

 

Cautions & Contraindications: None known (Bone, 2003, p. 468)

Advertisements

Actaea racemosa

PCD3619_IMG0015

Brandsford, W. D. (1988). Actae racemosa var. racemosa. Retrieved from: http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=9316

Botanical Name: Actaea racemosa/Cimicifuga racemosa
Common name: Black Cohosh, black snakeroot (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
Family: Ranunculaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 428)
Parts used: root and rhizome (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)

History/Folklore: Traditionally used in North America to treat snakebites hence its common name (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)

Constituents: triterpene glycosides (incl. actein, 23-epi-26-deoxyacetin, cimiracemoside A and cimicifugoside); aromatic acids (incl. ferulic, isoferulic and aceryl caffeic acid); resins; tannins and fatty acids (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 428).

Actions

  • Hormone modulation (Braun & Cohen, 2007, p. 185)
    • Suppresses Luteinising hormone (LH) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Antirheumatic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Spasmolytic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 430)
  • Antioxidant (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 430)

Indications

  • Conditions requiring a reducing of LH levels
    • Infertility
    • Miscarriage
    • Cyst formation
    • Ovarian tumorigenesis
    • Polycystic ovarian syndrome
  • Menopausal symptoms (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 427, 430-433; Braun & Cohen, 2007, p. 186; Beer & Neff, 2013)
  • Arthritis and rheumatism (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Neuralagia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Sciatica (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Menstrual disturbances (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427; Braun & Cohen, 2007, p. 187)
  • Disorders or the respiratory tract (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Tinnitus (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Osteoperosis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)

 

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Dried root/rhizome decoction: 0.9-6g/day
  • Liquid extract (1:1): 0.9-6mL/day
  • Tincture (1:5): 3.0-7.5mL/day

(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)

 

Cautions

  • High doses may cause frontal headache (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 427, 436)
  • Commission E suggests treatment should no exceed 6 months (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 427)
  • Caution to be taken in individuals with oestrogen-sensitive malignant tumors (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 435)
  • Long term use is associated with liver damage (low incidence) (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 435, 437; Braun & Cohen, 2007, p. 187)

 

Contraindications

  • Pregnancy and lactation (despite traditional use for assisting childbirth) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 428)
  • Individuals with pre-existing liver disease (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 435)

Fucus vesiculosuis

cha-de-fucus-vesiculosus-beneficios-e-propriedades

Reprodução. (n.d.). Chá de Fucus vesiculosus – Benefícios e propriedades. Retrieved from: http://chabeneficios.com.br/cha-de-fucus-vesiculosus-beneficios-e-propriedades/

Botanical Name: Fucus vesiculosis
Common name: Kelp, Bladderwrack (Natural Standard, 2014)
Family: Fucaceae (Natural Standard, 2014)
Parts used: Whole Plant (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

Constituents:

  • Phenolic compounds
  • Mucopolysaccharides
  • Sulphuryl-, sulphonyl- & phosphonyl-glycosyl ester diglycerides
  • Trace metals (notably iodine)

(Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

 

Actions

  • Antirheumatic (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)
  • Antibacterial (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Antifungal (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Anticoagulant (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Antioxidant (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Indications

  • Hypothyroid, underactive thyroid and goitre (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Acne (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Atopic dermatitis (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Burns (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Cancer (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Gingivitis (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Herpes (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Hyperglycaemia (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Kidney disease (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Preparation & Dosage:

  • Dried herb: 0.8-2g dried thallus/tds
  • Tincture (1:5 in 25%): 2-6mL/tds
  • Fluid extract (1:1 in 25%): 0.5-2mL/tds

(Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

 

Cautions & Contradictions:

  • Due to the plants high iodine content it may interfere with pre existing thyroid abnormal thyroid function (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)
  • Brown seaweeds are known to concentrate toxic elements such as heavy metals (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)
  • Binding properties of fucoidan may reduce intestinal iron absorption (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

Curcuma longa

turmeric-info0
HowStuffWorks. (2014). Tumeric. Retrieved from: http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/botany/turmeric-info.htm

Turmeric-Root-and-Powder-1024x666
Christie, D. (2014). Top 5 Benefits of Tumeric. Retrieved from: http://www.harboursidefitness.com.au/blog-post/top-5-benefits-of-turmeric/

Botanical Name: Curcuma longa
Common name: Tumeric, Indian saffron, jianghuang (Chinese), shati (Sanskrit) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 900)
Family: Zingeberaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 901)
Parts used: root and rhizome Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 901)

Quality: Pungent, bitter, astringent, heating (Pole, 2006, p. 282). In Ayurvedic medicine the herb is used to dry damp and move stagnation in the blood (Pole, 2006, p. 282).

History/Folklore: Native to India and South-East Asia, Tumeric has been recorded in medical texts dating back to 600BC (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 900).

Constituents: Essential oil (sesquiterpene ketones, zingiberene, phellandrene, sabinene, cineole and borneol); Yellow pigments “diarylheptanoids” or “curcuminoids” (incl. curcumin) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 901).

Yellow pigment curcumin has been shown to influence transcription factors, cytokines, growth factors, kinases and other enzymes (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 900).

Actions

  • Anti-inflammatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 902-903; Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Anti-platelet (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 903; Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Antioxidant (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 904; Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Hepatoprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 904-905)
  • Nephroprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 904-905)
  • Neuroprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 905)
  • Cardioprotective and vasoprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 905)
  • Hypolipidaemia (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 905-906)
  • Antibacterial (Pole, 2006, p. 282; Zorotchian Moghadamtousi, Abdul Kadir, Hassandarvish, Tajik, Abubakar & Zandi, 2014, p. 2)
  • Antimicrobial (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 906-907)
  • Antiparasitic (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 907)
  • Antiviral (Zorotchian Moghadamtousi et al., 2014, pp. 2-3)
  • Antiparasitic (Zorotchian Moghadamtousi et al., 2014, p. 2)
  • Antitumor (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 908)
  • Anti-depressant (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 909)
  • Radioprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 910)
  • Antiallergic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 910)
  • Emmenagogue (Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Blood tonic (Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Carminative (Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Alterative (Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Vulunary (Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • Anti-carcinogenic (Pole, 2006, p. 282)
  • TCM specific: blood and qi tonifier with analgesic properties (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 900).

Indications

  • Cancer prevention (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 907)
  • Cystic fibrosis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 909)
  • HIV/AIDS (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 910)
    • One human trial exhibited an increase in CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte counts (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 910)
    • Another human trial showed relief of HIV-associated chronic diarrhoea (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 910)
  • Eye disorders (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 911)
  • Genetic diseases (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 911)
  • Alzehimer’s disease (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 916)
  • Skin conditions (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 916)
  • Candida (Zorotchian Moghadamtousi et al., 2014, p. 7)
  • Helicobacter pylori (Zorotchian Moghadamtousi et al., 2014, p. 8)

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Liquid extract (1:1): 5-14mL/day
  • 4g powdered tumeric mixed with water/1-2 day

(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 901)

Cautions

  • Doses > 15g/day should not be administered long term or in conjunction with anti-platelet or anti-coagulant medication (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 917)
  • Individuals complaining of hair loss (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 917)
  • Women trying to conceive (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 917)
  • Pregnancy (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 918)

Contraindications

  • Biliary tract obstruction (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 917)
  • In Ayurvedic medicine the herb is contraindicated in high vāta and pitta (Pole, 2006, p. 283).
  • Acute jaundice and hepatitis (Pole, 2006, p. 283).

Combinations

  • For liver congestion: combine with kutki, bhumiamalaki and pippali (Pole, 2006, p. 283)
  • Small amounts of long/black pepper enhances anti-inflammatory activity of turmeric (Pole, 2006, p. 283)
  • For congestion of the lower abdomen and menstrual imbalance: combine with guggulu, mustaka and purnarnava (Pole, 2006, p. 283)

Interactions: Turmeric may potentiate effects of anti-platelet or anticoagulant medications (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 918).

Filipendula ulmaria

tumblr_mgqkkr58l61qgzqeto1_1280

Systematica (2013). Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. [as Spiraea ulmaria L.]. Retrieved from: http://www.systematica.org/post/41370444569/filipendula-ulmaria-l-maxim-as-spiraea

1600px-Filipendula_ulmaria_(flowers)

Hillewaert, H. (2008). Meadowsweet at Kampenhout, Belgium. Retrieved from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Filipendula_ulmaria_%28flowers%29.jpg

Botanical Name: Filipendula ulmaria
Common name: Medowsweet (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
Family: Rosaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 743).
Parts used: Aerial parts (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)

History/Folklore:

  • One of the three herbs most sacred to the Druids (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742).
  • One of 50 ingredients in drink ‘Save’ mentioned in Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742).
  • Salic acid (from which acetylsalicyclic is derived) was extracted from its flowerbud playing an important role in the development of aspirin (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742).

Constituents: Flavonoids (incl. rutin, glycosides of quercetin and kaempferol glycosides); hydrolysable tannins (notably rugosin-D); phenolic glycosides (incl. spiraein); and essential oil (containing salicylaldehyde, phenylethyl alcohol, benzyl alcohol and methylsalicylate) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 743).

Actions

  • Anti-ulcer (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 742, 743)
  • Antacid (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Diuretic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Mild urinary antiseptic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Astringent (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Anti-thrombotic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Anti-coagulant (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Antibacterial (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Antimicrobial (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Immunomodulatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 743)
  • Hepatoprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Gastroprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Antioxidant (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)

Indications

  • Cervical dysplasia (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 742, 744)
  • Acne (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Wound healing (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)

Traditional indicatons

  • Disorders of the upper GI tract (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Flatulence (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Dyspepsia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Indigestion (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Gastric reflux (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Hyperacidity (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Gastric ulcers (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Diarrhoea (notably in children) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Cystitis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Kidney stones (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Gout and rheumatic disease (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Fever (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Infusion: 12-18g dried herb/day
  • Liquid extract (1:1): 4.5-18mL/day
  • Tincture (1:5): 6-12ml/day

(Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 742-743)

Cautions

  • Constipation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Iron deficient anemia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Malnutrition (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Long term use of high doses not advised (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Due to presence of salicylates, caution is to be taken in individuals with salicylate sensitivity or glucose-6-phosphate deficiency (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Bleeding disorders, due to anticoagulant activity (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Caution to be taken in children under 15 years old (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 745)

Contraindications: Pregnancy and lactation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)

Interactions:

  • Presence of tannins may interfere with absorption of metal ions, thiamine and alkaloids. It is recommended the herb to be taken at least 2hrs away from other minteral supplementation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • May theoretically potentiate effects of anticoagulant drugs (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)

Vitis vinifera

nebbiolo

Giovanni, D. (2013). Barbaresco DOCG. Retrieved from: http://demarie.com/our-wines/barbaresco-docg/?lang=en

Botanical Name: Vitis vinifera
Common name: Grape, Grapeseed extract (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 565)
Family: Vitaceae (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 565)
Parts used: seeds, grape skins (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 565)

Constituents: Proanthocyanidins and stilbenes (incl. resveratrol and viniferins) (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 565)

Actions

  • Antioxidant (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 566; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 233)
  • Anti-carcinogenic (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 566)
  • Anti-tumor (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 566)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 566)
  • Cardioprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 566)
  • Neuroprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 567)
  • Vasoprotective (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 233)

 

Indications

  • Chronic venus insufficiency (Natural Standard, 2014; Kiesewetter, Koscielny, Kalus, Vix, Peil, Petrini, Van Toor, & de Mey, 2000)
  • Fluid retentions/peripheral venous insufficiency/capillary resistance (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 567)
  • OEdema (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Diabetic retinopathy (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Diabetic nephropahy (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568)
  • Eye strain (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568)
  • Hyperlidaemia (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568)
  • Atherosclerosis (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568)
  • Dermal wound healing (topical) (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568)
  • Chloasma/Melasma (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Pancreatitis (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Sun burn (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 568)
  • Protection against chemical toxicity (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 569; Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Dosage & Preparation: Fluid extract (1:1): 20-40mL/week (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 569)

Cautions & Contraindications: Adverse effects are uncommon (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 569)

Interactions:

  • Theoretically additive effect when combined with anti-platelet medication (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 569)
  • Theoretical increased risk of bleeding when used in conjunction with anticoagulant drugs (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 569)
  • Tannins may decrease iron absorption, best to take at least 2 hrs apart (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 569)

Vaccinium myrtillus

203_Vaccinum_myrtillus_L

Masclef, A. (1891). 203 Vaccinum myrtillus L. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccinium_myrtillus#mediaviewer/File:203_Vaccinum_myrtillus_L.jpg

Botanical Name: Vaccinium myrtillus
Common name: Bilberry, Blueberry, Huckleberry (Heinrich, Barnes, Gibbons & Williamson, 2012, p. 221)
Family: Ericaceae (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
Parts used: Fruit (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 221)

History/Folklore: Bilberry fruit is a well-known food. In World War II Bilberry wine and jam was consumed by RAF pilots to improve night vision (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 419). Although the herb was traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, modern research revolves around the cardiovascular system (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222). Other traditional indications include scurvy, urinary complaints, and to “dry up” breast milk” (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 419).

Constituents: anthocyanosides (notably: galactosides and glucosides of cyaniding); delphidin; malvidin; vitamin C; and volatile flavour components (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 221).

Actions

  • Vasoprotective (Bone, 2003, p. 93; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 419)
  • Antioxidant (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Bone, 2003, p. 93; Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222)
  • Anti-platelet (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222)
  • Anti-atherosclerotic (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222)
  • Spasmolytic (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222)
  • Anti-ulcer (Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222)
  • Astringent (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 419).

 

Indications

  • Vision disorders (Bone, 2003, p. 93; Heinrich et al., 2012, p. 222)
  • Simple glaucoma (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Venus insufficiency (notably of lower limbs) (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Peripheral vascular disorders (Bone, 2003, p. 93; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 419)
  • Diabetic retinopathy (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Chronic primary dysmenorrhoea (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Raynaud’s syndrome (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Venous disorders during pregnancy (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Hemorrhoids (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Decreased capillary resistance (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Nonspecific acute diarrhoea (Bone, 2003, p. 93)
  • Mild inflammation of mouth and throat (topical) (Bone, 2003, p. 93)

 

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Liquid extract (1:1): 3-6mL/day or 20-40mL/week
  • Tablet: tablets providing 20-120mg of anthocyanins/day

Cautions: Doses exceeding 100mg/day of anthocyanins should be used cautiously in patients with haemorrhagic disorders (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 424).

Interactions: Possible interactions with warfarin and anti-platelet drugs when administered in high doses (Bone, 2003, p. 93)