Fucus vesiculosuis

cha-de-fucus-vesiculosus-beneficios-e-propriedades

Reprodução. (n.d.). Chá de Fucus vesiculosus – Benefícios e propriedades. Retrieved from: http://chabeneficios.com.br/cha-de-fucus-vesiculosus-beneficios-e-propriedades/

Botanical Name: Fucus vesiculosis
Common name: Kelp, Bladderwrack (Natural Standard, 2014)
Family: Fucaceae (Natural Standard, 2014)
Parts used: Whole Plant (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

Constituents:

  • Phenolic compounds
  • Mucopolysaccharides
  • Sulphuryl-, sulphonyl- & phosphonyl-glycosyl ester diglycerides
  • Trace metals (notably iodine)

(Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

 

Actions

  • Antirheumatic (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)
  • Antibacterial (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Antifungal (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Anticoagulant (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Antioxidant (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Indications

  • Hypothyroid, underactive thyroid and goitre (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Acne (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Atopic dermatitis (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Burns (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Cancer (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Gingivitis (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Herpes (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Hyperglycaemia (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Kidney disease (Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Preparation & Dosage:

  • Dried herb: 0.8-2g dried thallus/tds
  • Tincture (1:5 in 25%): 2-6mL/tds
  • Fluid extract (1:1 in 25%): 0.5-2mL/tds

(Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

 

Cautions & Contradictions:

  • Due to the plants high iodine content it may interfere with pre existing thyroid abnormal thyroid function (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)
  • Brown seaweeds are known to concentrate toxic elements such as heavy metals (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)
  • Binding properties of fucoidan may reduce intestinal iron absorption (Hoffmann, 2010, p. 551)

Filipendula ulmaria

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Systematica (2013). Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. [as Spiraea ulmaria L.]. Retrieved from: http://www.systematica.org/post/41370444569/filipendula-ulmaria-l-maxim-as-spiraea

1600px-Filipendula_ulmaria_(flowers)

Hillewaert, H. (2008). Meadowsweet at Kampenhout, Belgium. Retrieved from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Filipendula_ulmaria_%28flowers%29.jpg

Botanical Name: Filipendula ulmaria
Common name: Medowsweet (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
Family: Rosaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 743).
Parts used: Aerial parts (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)

History/Folklore:

  • One of the three herbs most sacred to the Druids (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742).
  • One of 50 ingredients in drink ‘Save’ mentioned in Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742).
  • Salic acid (from which acetylsalicyclic is derived) was extracted from its flowerbud playing an important role in the development of aspirin (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742).

Constituents: Flavonoids (incl. rutin, glycosides of quercetin and kaempferol glycosides); hydrolysable tannins (notably rugosin-D); phenolic glycosides (incl. spiraein); and essential oil (containing salicylaldehyde, phenylethyl alcohol, benzyl alcohol and methylsalicylate) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 743).

Actions

  • Anti-ulcer (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 742, 743)
  • Antacid (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Diuretic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Mild urinary antiseptic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Astringent (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Anti-thrombotic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Anti-coagulant (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Antibacterial (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Antimicrobial (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Immunomodulatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 743)
  • Hepatoprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Gastroprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Antioxidant (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)

Indications

  • Cervical dysplasia (Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 742, 744)
  • Acne (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 691)
  • Wound healing (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)

Traditional indicatons

  • Disorders of the upper GI tract (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Flatulence (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Dyspepsia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Indigestion (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Gastric reflux (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Hyperacidity (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Gastric ulcers (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Diarrhoea (notably in children) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Cystitis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Kidney stones (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742)
  • Gout and rheumatic disease (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Fever (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 742; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Infusion: 12-18g dried herb/day
  • Liquid extract (1:1): 4.5-18mL/day
  • Tincture (1:5): 6-12ml/day

(Bone & Mills, 2013, pp. 742-743)

Cautions

  • Constipation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Iron deficient anemia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Malnutrition (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Long term use of high doses not advised (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Due to presence of salicylates, caution is to be taken in individuals with salicylate sensitivity or glucose-6-phosphate deficiency (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 550)
  • Bleeding disorders, due to anticoagulant activity (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • Caution to be taken in children under 15 years old (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 745)

Contraindications: Pregnancy and lactation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)

Interactions:

  • Presence of tannins may interfere with absorption of metal ions, thiamine and alkaloids. It is recommended the herb to be taken at least 2hrs away from other minteral supplementation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)
  • May theoretically potentiate effects of anticoagulant drugs (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 744)

Salvia miltiorrhiza

salvia1
Dharmananda, S. (n.d.). Salvia. Retrieved from: http://www.itmonline.org/arts/salvia.htm

Botanical Name: Salvia miltiorrhiza
Common name: dan shen (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 229), red sage.
Family: Lamiaceae
Parts used: dried root (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)

History/Folklore: TCM herb traditionally used for huo xue hua yu (activating blood circulation to disperse stasis), jie du xiao zhong (removing toxic substances and reducing swelling), and qing xin an shen (nourishing the heart to calm the mind) (Gao, Mendoza, Lu & Lawrence, 2012).

Constituents:

  • Tanshinone I
  • Tanshinone IIA
  • Cryptotanshinone
  • Dihydrotanshinone
  • Danshensu
  • Salvianolic acid B

(Lin & Hsieh, 2010)

 

Actions

  • Hypotensive (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)
  • Anti-coagulant (Gao et al., 2012)
  • Anti-platelet (Lin & Hsieh, 2010; Gao et al., 2012)
  • Antioxidant (Lin & Hsieh, 2010; Gao et al., 2012)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)
  • GABA receptor (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 229)
  • Neuroprotective (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)
  • Hepatoprotective (Gao et al., 2012)
  • Immunomodulatory (Gao et al., 2012)

 

Indications

Traditional:

  • Irrengular menstruation
  • Dysmenorrhea
  • Amenorrhea
  • Precordial pain
  • Abdominal pain
  • Body/joint pain
  • Skin ulcer
  • Palpitations
  • Insomnia

(Gao et al., 2012)

 

Contemporary:

  • Angina pectoris (Gao et al., 2012)
  • Coronary heart disease (Gao et al., 2012)
  • Ischaemic damage following stroke (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 229; Gao et al., 2012)
  • Reduce/prolongs development of altherosclerosis (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)
  • Prevents cerebral infarction (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)
  • Myocardial infarction (Gao et al., 2012)

 

Combinations: Combines with Astraglais membranaceus and Polygonum multiflorum in a age tonic (Bone, 2010, p. 77)

 

Interactions: Contraindicated in individuals on warfarin (Lin & Hsieh, 2010)