Harpagophytum procumbens

harpagofito

HIPERnatural.COM. (2014). HARPAGOFITO. Retrieved from: http://www.hipernatural.com/es/pltharpagofito.html

Botanical Name: Harpagophytum procumbens
Common name: Devil’s Claw (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557)
Family: Pedaliaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 510)
Parts used: Rhizome (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557), secondary root tuber (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)

History/Folklore: Native to Kalahari region of South Africa (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509). In South African traditional medicine, the herb is used in pregnancy to relieve pain and as a postpartum (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514).

Constituents: Iridoid glycosides (incl. harpagide, harpagoside and procumbide); flavonoids (kaempferol and luteolin glycosides); phenolic acids (cholorogenic and cinnamic acid); quinone (harpagoquinone; triterpenes; oleanolic and ursolic acids derivatives; esters and sugars (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557)

 

Actions

  • Anti-inflammatory (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Antirheumatic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Anodyne (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557)
  • Hepatic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557)
  • Analgesic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Bitter (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Anti-arrhythmia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)

Indications

  • Arthritis (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557)
  • Endometriosis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Muscle pain (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Fever (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Allergic reactions (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)
  • Wound, ulcers, boils (topical) (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 509)

 

Dosage & Preparation:

  • Tincture (1:5 in 40%): 1-2mL/tds
  • Decoction: 0.5 tsp/cup water/tds
  • 5g/day (for loss of appetite 1.5g/day)

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 557)

 

Cautions

  • Oesophageal reflux and states of hyperacidity (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514)
  • Pregnancy (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514)

 

Contraindications: Gastric or duodenal ulcers (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514)

Interactions:

  • Moderate inhibitory effect towards cytochrome P450 enzyme: CYP 2C8, CYP 2C9, CYP 2C19 and CYP 3A4 (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514)
  • May potentiate effects of Warfarin (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514)
  • May theoretically interact with anti-arrhythmic drugs (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 514)

Piscidia erythrina

jdkwapr

Medowbeautynursey.com. (n.d.). Piscidia piscipula. Retrieved from: http://meadowbeautynursery.com/jamaica-dogwood/

Botanical Name: Piscidia erythrina
Common name: Jamaica Dogwood
Family: Fabaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
Parts used: Root Bark (Bone, 2003, p. 289) Stem (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)

Folklore and traditional use: Originated in West India, traditionally used as a fish poison (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573).

 

Constituents: Isoflavins (incl. lisetin, jamaicin, ichtyone); Rotenoids (rotenone, milletone, isomilletone); and organic acids (incl. piscidic acid, beta-sitosterol and tannins) (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)

 

Actions

  • Nervine (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
  • Anodyne (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
  • Antispasmodic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573; Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Analgesic (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Mild sedative (Bone, 2003, p. 289)

 

Indications

  • Migrane (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
  • Neuralgia (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
  • Pain relief from nervous tension (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
  • Toothache (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Ovarian and uterine pain (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)
  • Insomnia (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Anxiety (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Dysmenorrhea (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Muscular spasm (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Rheumatism (Bone, 2003, p. 289)

 

Preparation: tincture, fluidextract or decoction (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)

 

Dosage: 3-6mL of 1:2 liquid extract/day (20-40mL/week) (Bone, 2003, p. 289)

 

Cautions & Contradictions:

  • Overdose produces toxic effects (Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Contraindicated in pregnancy and lactation (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573; Bone, 2003, p. 289)
  • Contraindicated in cardiac insufficiency (Bone, 2003, p. 289)

 

Interactions: May increase effects of concomitant therapies (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 573)

Eschscholtzia californica

Eschscholzia_californica_i01

Step, E., & Watson, W. (1896). Favorite Flowers of Garden and Greenhouse. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eschscholzia_californica#mediaviewer/File:Eschscholzia_californica_i01.jpg

Botanical Name: Eschscholtzia californica
Common name: California Poppy (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
Family: Papveraceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
Parts used: Dried aerial parts (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)

Folklore: Used by Native Americans and Hispanics for it’s sedative and analgesic effects. Traditionally prescribed for toothache in children (Bone, 2003, p. 124).

 

Constituents:

  • Alkaloids: chelerythrine (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 230)
  • Isoquinoline alkaloids (eshscholtzine and californidine) (Bone, 2003, p. 124)
  • Flavonoids (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)

 

Actions

  • Nervine (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
  • Hypnotic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547; Bone, 2003, p. 124)
  • Antispasmodic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
  • Anodyne (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
  • Anxiolytic (Bone, 2003, p. 124)
  • Mild sedative (Bone, 2003, p. 124)
  • Analgesic (Bone, 2003, p. 124)

Extracts have been shown to inhibit enzymatic degradation of catecholamines, the synthesis of adrenalin, dopamine, beta-hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 230).

  • Antitumor

Alkaloid constituent chelerythrine is a well known protein kinase C inhibitor, which has antitumor activity (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 230).

  • Antiinflammatory (Bone & Mills, 2010, p. 230)

 

Indications

  • Overexcitment and sleeplessness in children (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
  • Gallbladder colic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)
  • Bone suggests Californian poppy to be useful in painful conditions where morphine or codeine may be used (2003, p. 124)
  • Anxiety (Bone, 2003, p. 124)
  • Disturbed sleep (Bone, 2003, p. 124)

 

Preparation & Dosage:

Tincture (1:5 in 25%)

  • To promote sleep 1-4mL at night
  • For antispasmodic indications 0.5-3mL/tds

Infusion

  • To promote restful sleep 1-2 tsp dried herb/1 cup water. Infuse 10 mins. Drink at night

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)

 

Cautions & Contradictions: None known (Bone, 2003, p. 124)

 

Combinations:

  • Combined with Corydalis cava for disturbed sleep (Bone, 2003, p. 124)

 

Interactions

  • Has additive effects when combines with other sedatives (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 547)