Lavandula officinalis

Lavandula_angustifolia_-_Köhler–s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-087

Köhler, F. E. (1897). Lavandula angustifolia – Köhler’s Medizinal-Pflanzen. Retrieved from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lavandula_angustifolia_-_K%C3%B6hler%E2%80%93s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-087.jpg

Botanical Name: Lavandula officinalis
Other names: Lavender, Lavandula angustifolia,
Family: Lamiaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 561
Parts used: Flower (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 638)

Constituents:

  • Essential/volatile oil: incl. linalyl acetate, linalool, lavandulyl acetate, borneol, limonene, caryophyllene)
  • Coumarines: incl. umbelliferone, herniarin, coumarin
  • Miscelaneous triterpenes
  • Flavonoids

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 561)

 

Actions:

  • Relaxing nervine (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Carminative (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 639; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Sedative/anxiolytic (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 639)
  • Antimicrobial (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 639)
  • Antioplastic effects (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 639)
  • Antispasmodic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Antidepressant (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Rubefacient (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Emmenagogue (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 561)
  • Hypotensive (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)

 

Folklore: Lavender and its oils have a long history of traditional use as an antiseptic in ancient Arabia, Greek and Roman medicine (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 638).

 

Indications

  • Alopecia and hair loss (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Anxiety (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Aphthous ulcers (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Ecezma (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Insect bites (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642)
  • Head lice (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Insomnia (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642)
  • Helps promote natural sleep (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Mood enhancement (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Stress related headaches (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 562)
  • Migraine (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Improved concentration and cognition (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642)
  • Dementia (Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Dyspepsia and bloating (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642)
  • Perineal discomfort following childbirth (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642; Natural Standard, 2014)
  • Dysmenorrhoea (Braun & Cohen, 2010, pp. 640-642; Natural Standard, 2014)

 

Preparation & Dosage:

Internal

Infusion: 1.5g (1-2tsp) dried flower/150mL water. Seep for 5 mins. Strain before drinking.

Liquid extract: (1:2) 2-4.5mL/day

 

External

For insect bites: 20 drops of oil/20mL “carrier oil” (e.g. almond) (for external application)

Lavender bath: seep 20-100g flowers in 2L boiling water. Strain and add to bath water

(Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 642)

 

Cautions & Contradictions: Internal toxic dose (based on animal studies) would translate to approximately 350g of lavender oil. Therefore the herb is considered safe in dose appropriate amounts (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 642)

 

Combinations: For depression combines well with Rosemary, Kola or Skullcap. For headaches may be combined with Lady’s slipper or Valarian (Hoffmann, 1990, p. 210).

One thought on “Lavandula officinalis

  1. Pingback: English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia / officinalis) | Herbal Materia Medica 2 Folio

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