Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

bearberry_diagram

Image I: 2006 – 2014 HealthyHomeGardening.com. (2014). Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Diagram. Retrieved from: http://healthyhomegardening.com/View_Image.php?pid=1960&ptype=plan&im=gardengeek/bearberry_diagram.jpg

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Image II: G. Terry. (2014). Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Retrieved from: http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ARUV

 

Common name: Bearberry (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393)
Family: Ericaceae (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 394)
Parts used: leaves (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393)

Constituents
Hydroquinone glycosides (including arbutin and methylarbutin)
Iridoids (monotropein)
Polyphenols (predominantly gallotannins)
Phenolic acids
Flavonoids (quercitrin, isoquercitrin, myricacitrin)
Triterpenes
Tannins
Volatile oil
Ursolic, malic and gallic acids
(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 394; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 529)

Actions
Urinary antiseptic
Astringent
Anti-inflammatory
Antibacterial
(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393)

Traditional use:
Indigenous to West North America, the leaves of uva-ursi have been used for ceremonial smoking and prepared as a tea to treat venereal disease and inflammation of the genitourinary tract (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393).

Indications:
Indications supported by clinical trials include:
Cystitis
Clinical studies also suggest use in inflammatory disorders such as: contact dermatitis, inflammatory odema and arthritis (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393).

Traditional indications include:
Cystitis
Urethritis
Prostatitis
Pyelitis
Lithuria
Intestinal irregulations
(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393)
Bedwetting
Vaginal ulceration and infection
(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 529)

Preparation & Dosage:
Cold infustion of dried leaves: 3-12g dried leaf/day
Tincture (1:2): 4.5-8.5mL/day, (1:5) 11-22mL/day
Liquid extract
Powdered leaves
(Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393)

Cautions & Contradictions:
Due to high tannin content, not suitable for prolonged internal use (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 394)
To be avoided in pregnancy and lactation (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 393)

Combinations: Combines with Elymus repens and Achillea millefolium for urinary infections (Hoffmann, 1990, p. 179)

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