Commiphora molmol

Commiphora_myrrha_-_Köhler–s_Medizinal-Pflanzen-019

Image I

it-024

Image II

Botanical Name: Commiphora molmol
Common name: Myrrh
Family: Sterculiaceae (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
Parts used: Gum resin (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)

Constituents

  • Volatile oil
  • Gum
  • Resins
  • Sterol

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)

 

Actions

  • Anti-catarrhal (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753)
  • Anti-parasitic (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753)
  • Astringent (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753)
  • Antimicrobial (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753)
  • Carminative (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Expectorant (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Vulnerary (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540; Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753)

 

As an anti-mircobial myrrh works in two complementary ways:

  1. Stimulates production of white blood corpuscles, which have anti-pathogenic actions.
  2. It has a direct anti-microbial effect

(Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)

 

History

The name ‘myrrh’ is likely derived from Arabic or Hebrew word ‘mur’ meaning bitter. The oleo-gum resin is obtained from the stem of Commiphora species native to Africa and Arabia (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753).

Has been used as a medicinal herb for thousands of years and is referenced, several times in the bible in the Psalms, the Song of Solomon and is commonly remembered as one of the three gifts the Magi brought to Christ (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753).

Despite ancient record, clinical trials are relatively recent. The herb is of significant value in the treatment of parasites, appearing to be active against parasites that infest deeper in the body than the gut, such as the liver and gallbladder (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 753).

 

Indications

  • Infections of the mouth

Mouth ulcers (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
Gingivitis (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
Pyorrhea (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)

  • Catarrhal problems

Pharyngitis (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
Sinusitis (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)

  • Common cold (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Respiratory complaints (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Boils (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Glandular fever (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Brucellosis (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • Wounds & abrasions (topical) (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)

 

Preparation & Dosage

Tincture (1:1 in 90%): 1-4mL/tds
Infusion*: 1-2tsp myrrh powder/1 cup water/tds

*Resin does not easily dissolve in water and therefore must be powdered well. Tincture preparation is the preferred preparation (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540).

 

Cautions & Contradictions:

  • Undiluted tincture may irritate mouth (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 540)
  • According to Chinese Medicine myrrh is contraindicated in pregnancy and in cases of excessive uterine bleeding, however animal studies have found no harmful effects (Bone & Mills, 2013, p. 758).

 

Combinations

  • Combines well with Echinacea for infections and in mouth washes
  • For external use, should be combined with distilled Witch Hazel

(Hoffmann, 1990, p. 218)

 

REFERENCE
Bone, K., & Mills, S. (2013). Principals and Practice of Phytotherapy (2nd ed.). Edinborough: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier.

Hoffmann, D. (2003). Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester Vermont: Healing Arts Press.

Hoffmann, D. (1990). Holistic Herbal. London: Thorsons

Image I: Köhler, F. (1897). Köhler’s Medizinal-Pflanzen. Retrieved from:http://pharm1.pharmazie.uni-greifswald.de/allgemei/koehler/koeh-eng.htm

Image II: Image juicy. (n.d.). Plants-Commiphora. Retrieved from: http://www.imagejuicy.com/images/plants/c/commiphora/2/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s