Calendula officinalis

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Image I

Calendula-officinalis-1

Image II

Botanical Name: Calendula officinalis
Common name: Marigold (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281).
Family: Asteraceae (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281).
Parts used: Flower (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281).

Constituents

  • Triterpene saponins
  • Flavonols: Astragalin, Hyperoside, Isoquercitrin and Rutin
  • Carotenoids: Flavoxanthin and Auroxanthin
  • Triterpendiol esters: Faradiol laurate, Faradiol myristate and Faradio palmitate
  • Terpenoids: Faradiol, Amidol and Calenduladiol

(Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281).

 

Actions

  • Antimicrobial (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281)
  • Antiviral (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281)
  • Antifungal (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)
  • Anti-inflammatory (Heinrich, Barnes, Gibbons & Williamson, 2012, p. 287; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535): Terepenoids shown to have anti-inflammatory activity (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281)
  • Astringent (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)
  • Cholagogue (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)
  • Promotes wound healing: Shown to stimulating physiological regeneration and epithelisation in surgical wounds (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 281)
  • Immunomodulation (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282)
  • Antioxidant (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282)
  • Antispasmodic (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)
  • Emmenagogue (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)
  • Hypoglycaemic (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282)
  • Hepatoprotective (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282)
  • Lymphatic (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)
  • Vulnerary (Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535)

 

Indications

  • Wounds and burns(Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282)
  • Gastro-intestinal inflammatory disorders (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 283)
  • Gingervitis (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 283)
  • Nappy rash (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 283)
  • Odema (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 282)

 

Preparation & Dosage

Infusion: 1-2g (dried herb) per day in divided doses
Liquid extract

  • Internal use: 1:2, 1.5-4.5mL/day in divided doses
  • External use: dilute 1:3

Tincture (1:5): 0.3-1.2mL tds
Oil

(Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 284).

 

Cautions: Irritant dermatitis has been reported, although rare (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 284). Considered a low toxicity herb (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 284; Hoffmann, 2003, p. 535).

 

Contradictions: Known allergy (Braun & Cohen, 2010, p. 284).

 

Combinations

  • For digestive problems combines with Althea officinalis and Geranium maculatum.
  • As an external soothing agent, can be combined with Ulmus rubra.
  • A useful antiseptic lotion can be produced when combined with Hydrastis canadensis and Commiphora myrrh.

(Hoffmann, 1990, p. 213)

 

REFERENCE
Braun, L., & Cohen, M. (2010). Herbs & Natural Supplements: An Evidence based Guide (3rd ed.). Chatswood NSW: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier.

Heinrich, M., Barnes, J., Gibbons, S., & Williamson, E. (2012). Fundamentals of Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy (2nd ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier.

Hoffmann, D. (2003). Medical Herbalism: The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. Rochester Vermont: Healing Arts Press.

Hoffmann, D. (1990). Holistic Herbal. London: Thorsons

Image I: Sturm, P. (1796). Scientific Illustration. Retrieved from: http://scientificillustration.tumblr.com/post/37266762036/heaveninawildflower-calendula-officinalis-l

Image II: Mrkvicka, A. (2004). Asteraceae / Calandula officinalis. Retrieved from: http://flora.nhm-wien.ac.at/Seiten-Arten/Calendula-officinalis.htm

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